ancientpeoples:

The Dying Lion, a stone panel from the North Palace of Ashurbanipal
Nineveh, northern IraqNeo-Assyrian
c.645 BC
This small alabaster panel was part of a series of wall panels that showed a royal hunt. It has long been acclaimed as a masterpiece; the skill of the Assyrian artist in the observation and realistic portrayal of the animal is clear.
Struck by one of the king’s arrows, blood gushes from the lion’s mouth. Veins stand out on its face. From a modern viewpoint, it is tempting to think that the artist sympathized with the dying animal. However, lions were regarded as symbolizing everything that was hostile to urban civilization and it is more probable that the viewer was meant to laugh, not cry.
There was a very long tradition of royal lion hunts in Mesopotamia, with similar scenes known from the late fourth millennium BC. The connection between kingship and lions was probably brought to western Europe as a result of the crusades in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries AD, when lions begin to decorate royal coats of arms.
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

The Dying Lion, a stone panel from the North Palace of Ashurbanipal

Nineveh, northern Iraq
Neo-Assyrian

c.645 BC

This small alabaster panel was part of a series of wall panels that showed a royal hunt. It has long been acclaimed as a masterpiece; the skill of the Assyrian artist in the observation and realistic portrayal of the animal is clear.

Struck by one of the king’s arrows, blood gushes from the lion’s mouth. Veins stand out on its face. From a modern viewpoint, it is tempting to think that the artist sympathized with the dying animal. However, lions were regarded as symbolizing everything that was hostile to urban civilization and it is more probable that the viewer was meant to laugh, not cry.

There was a very long tradition of royal lion hunts in Mesopotamia, with similar scenes known from the late fourth millennium BC. The connection between kingship and lions was probably brought to western Europe as a result of the crusades in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries AD, when lions begin to decorate royal coats of arms.

Source: British Museum

(via shahadbreezy)

thaqafa:

Iraqi Christians expelled from Mosul by ISIS share their stories

this is heartbreaking :( 

the lady talks about how they threatened to shoot her and her elderly siblings if they didn’t leave the house within a few hours. they couldn’t take any supplies with them (money, clothes, food, medical supplies) since ISIS would confiscate it. And they call themselves Islamic..

(via shahadbreezy)

mertseger:

Ziggurat of King Urnammu, Ur (El Muqeiyar), Iraq. 2100 B.C. 
 Taller and more tower like ziggurats - has 3 levels. Sun-baked bricks glazed with different colors. Temple located on top of the city. All activities take place on varying levels (law, trading, economics). Reflect widespread belief that mountaintops are the dwelling places of gods. Felt they could provide a residence for a deity by creating their own artificial mountains. 

mertseger:

Ziggurat of King Urnammu, Ur (El Muqeiyar), Iraq. 2100 B.C. 

 Taller and more tower like ziggurats - has 3 levels. Sun-baked bricks glazed with different colors. Temple located on top of the city. All activities take place on varying levels (law, trading, economics). Reflect widespread belief that mountaintops are the dwelling places of gods. Felt they could provide a residence for a deity by creating their own artificial mountains. 

(via shahadbreezy)

aliofbabylon:

If you’re a Muslim and you choose to play dumb when it comes to ISIS and remain silent, then I will remind you of the same things you people have been saying in regards to Palestine and Israel. If you’re silent in times of injustice and oppression, then you have taken the side of the oppressor. Stop turning a blind eye, and stand up to this cancer that’s plaguing our region. 

(via shemspenguin)


Iraqis start painting “we are all Christians” on their homes and buildingsafter ISIS mark Christian homes and business with the arabic letter “n”, which stands for the word “Nasrani” meaning ‘Christian’ in Arabic.

Iraqis start painting “we are all Christians” on their homes and buildingsafter ISIS mark Christian homes and business with the arabic letter “n”, which stands for the word “Nasrani” meaning ‘Christian’ in Arabic.

(via shemspenguin)

HUSAIN: Fleeing Iraqi Christians find safe haven at the Shrine of Imam Ali ›

In a statement earlier this week, the shrine of Imam Ali announced that “it is ready to host the Christian families who departed their houses in fear of being killed by what is so called the Islamic State of Iraq and Levant.” The deputy secretary-general of the Holy Shrine, Zuhair Shurba, told IraqiNews.com “The Holy Shrine can host many Christian families and provide them all their basic needs.”

Reportedly, the offer is also available to Sunnis, Kurds and all other Iraqis fleeing violence at the hands of ISIS. Following the announcements, the Iraqi city of Basra also opened its facilities to displaced Christians, and is reportedly hosting approximately 100 families from surrounding regions.